Treatment of pain after a procedure is planned for each patient individually, according to the patient’s health, allergies, and the performed surgery. Moderate and severe pain may occur at home for 1–4 days, sometimes even longer. We recommend that you have at home a sufficient amount of painkillers, which can be used safely according to the staff’s instructions.

Paracetamol is a basic painkiller, which suits most patients. It comes in pills, solutions, and suppositories. It can also be injected in the hospital.

Anti-inflammatory medicines reduce swelling, inflammation, pain, and fever (e.g. ibuprofen and ketoprofen). They come in pills, solutions, and suppositories. If the lining of your stomach is sensitive, it is advisable to use medication that protects the stomach.

Paracetamol and anti-inflammatory medicines can also be taken simultaneously, which often provides the best pain relief. As a result, the need for stronger painkillers is reduced, also reducing their side-effects.

Painkillers can also be combined with various forms of anaesthesia.

The wound resulting from the surgery can be anaesthetized, rendering the area around the wound painless for a few hours.

Anaesthetizing a nerve plexus or individual nerves for the surgery also acts as pain relief after the surgery. The effects may last for as long as 12 hours.

Pain relief pumps are used, for example, in shoulder surgery. The surgeon inserts a thin plastic tube into the operated area, and an automatic pump provides the area with an anaesthetic agent evenly and sufficiently. Additional information on the pump.

If the fore mentioned forms of pain treatment do not provide sufficient pain relief, strong painkillers, opiates, are used. They are highly effective, but they have also side-effects, such as fatigue, nausea, and constipation.

Note!

You must not perform demanding tasks, such as driving a car or using dangerous machinery while under the influence of strong painkillers (opiates). They must not be used together with alcohol.  

10/18/2017 päiväkirurgia 2